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Imaging of impingement syndromes around the hip joint

Abstract

Impingement syndromes are increasingly recognised as significant causes of hip pain and dysfunction. A broad spectrum of intraarticular and extraarticular conditions has been implicated in their pathophysiology. Physical examination is often inconclusive as clinical findings may be unclear or misleading, often simulating other disorders. With current improvements in imaging techniques and better understanding of hip impingement related pathomechanisms, these entities can be accurately diagnosed. In addition, preoperative imaging has allowed for targeted treatment planning. This article provides an overview of the various types of hip impingement, including femoroacetabular impingement, ischiofemoral impingement, snapping hip syndrome, greater trochanteric-pelvic and subspine impingement. Current literature data regarding their pathogenesis, clinical manifestation and imaging work-up are discussed.

Hip Int 2017; 27(4): 317 - 328

Article Type: REVIEW

DOI:10.5301/hipint.5000526

Authors

Evangelia E. Vassalou, Aristeidis H. Zibis, Michail E. Klontzas, Apostolos H. Karantanas

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: None.
Conflict of interest: None.

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Authors

Affiliations

  •  Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital, Heraklion - Greece
  •  Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Heraklion - Greece
  •  Department of Anatomy, University of Thessalia, Medical School, Larissa - Greece
  •  Imperial College London, London - UK

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