Advertisement

Effects of various anchoring components and loading conditions on primary stability of acetabular revision implant

Effects of various anchoring components and loading conditions on primary stability of acetabular revision implant

Hip Int 2016; 26(6): 591 - 597

Article Type: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

DOI:10.5301/hipint.5000394

Authors

Christian Voigt, Andreas Schaller, Carsten Klöhn, Roger Scholz

Abstract

Purpose

In revision total hip arthroplasty, until today, orthopaedic surgeons are missing evidence-based guidelines on cementless acetabular cup fixation.

Methods

5 finite element models were generated featuring the following anchorage strategies: 1 short peg, 1 long peg, 2 long screws, 3 short screws and zero anchoring components for reference. The micromotions at the implant-bone interface were analyzed for 3 different loadcases, “Seated leg-crossing” (joint force 940 N, impingement force 750 N), “Normal gait” (joint force 1820 N), and “Stumbling” (joint force 4520 N).

Results

Within the same loadcase, percentages of interface area below 28 µm are nearly identical in all anchorage strategies. The average percentage of interface area below 28 µm is 31% for “Seated leg-crossing”, 17% for “Normal gait”, and 11% for “Stumbling”. Maximal von Mises stresses in “Normal gait”, for example, reach 12 MPa in the short peg, 48 MPa in the long peg, 15 MPa in 1 of the 2 long screws, and 85 MPa in 1 of the 3 short screws.

Conclusions

Common orthopaedic practice, to use peg or screw fixation alternatively according to bone availability or other clinical aspects, can be confirmed. The short peg may be a good alternative to the long peg with regard to the preservation of bone stock. However, the current study implies that the extent of potential osseointegration depends less on the chosen anchorage strategy but strongly on postoperative loading conditions. Total hip patients should be instructed on adequate postoperative activities.

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: Funds were received from Deutsche Arthrose-Hilfe e.V., Frankfurt, Germany.
Conflict of interest: None.

This article is available as full text PDF.

  • If you are a Subscriber, please log in now.

  • Article price: Eur 36,00
  • You will be granted access to the article for 72 hours and you will be able to download any format (PDF or ePUB). The article will be available in your login area under "My PayPerView". You will need to register a new account (unless you already own an account with this journal), and you will be guided through our online shop. Online purchases are paid by Credit Card through PayPal.
  • If you are not a Subscriber you may:
  • Subscribe to this journal
  • Unlimited access to all our archives, 24 hour a day, every day of the week.

Authors

Affiliations

  • Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Plastic Surgery, Laboratory for Biomechanics, Leipzig University, Leipzig - Germany
  • Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Leipzig University of Applied Sciences (HTWK), Leipzig - Germany

Article usage statistics

The blue line displays unique views in the time frame indicated.
The yellow line displays unique downloads.
Views and downloads are counted only once per session.

This article has supplementary materials available to download.

  • If you are a Subscriber, please log in now.

  • Article price: Eur 36,00
  • You will be granted access to the article for 72 hours and you will be able to download any format (PDF or ePUB). The article will be available in your login area under "My PayPerView". You will need to register a new account (unless you already own an account with this journal), and you will be guided through our online shop. Online purchases are paid by Credit Card through PayPal.
  • If you are not a Subscriber you may:
  • Subscribe to this journal
  • Unlimited access to all our archives, 24 hour a day, every day of the week.