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Early periprosthetic joint infection and debridement, antibiotics and implant retention in arthroplasty for femoral neck fracture

Early periprosthetic joint infection and debridement, antibiotics and implant retention in arthroplasty for femoral neck fracture

Post author correction

Article Type: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

Article Subject: Trauma

DOI:10.5301/hipint.5000467

Authors

Carl Mellner, Thomas Eisler, Björn Knutsson, Sebastian Mukka

Abstract

Introduction

Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication of hip arthroplasty for femoral neck fractures (FNF). Debridement, antibiotics and implant retention (DAIR) is recommended in early PJI in association with stable implants. Few studies have evaluated the outcome of DAIR in this fragile population.The purpose of this study was to analyse risk factors for PJI and the short-term outcome of DAIR in FNF patients treated with a hip arthroplasty.

Methods

A consecutive series of 736 patients (median age 81 years, 490 women, 246 men) had been treated with either a total hip arthroplasty or a hemi hip arthroplasty for a displaced FNF at our institution. 33 (4.5%) of the hips developed an early (<6 weeks post operatively) PJI and 28 (3.8%) of these patients were treated according to the DAIR-protocol. Regression analyses were performed to assess risk factors for developing a PJI.

Results

DAIR eradicated the PJI in 82% (23/28) of patients at a median follow-up of 31 (SD 29.8) months of the infected hips.The logistic regression analysis indicated that 2 or more changes of the primary dressing due to wound bleeding was associated with an increased risk for developing PJI (OR 4.9, 95% 1.5 to 16.1, p = 0.01).

Conclusions

The short-term success-rate of DAIR was unexpectedly favourable in this fragile patient population; the results being on par with that after PJI in osteoarthritis patients. The need for repeated bandage changes postoperatively indicates an increased risk for PJI and should prompt early surgical intervention.

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: Financial support has been received from the Visare Norr Fund, Northern County Councils.
Conflict of interest: None.

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Authors

Affiliations

  • Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå - Sweden
  • Department of Clinical Sciences at Danderyd Hospital (KIDS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm - Sweden

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